Help I Need Belgian Waffles

Belgium Waffles

Belgium Waffles

It has been a great week filled with happy news. Cait & Sam closed on their new house! At first, I did not see “the vision” of what this neglected structure could be, but after getting down and dirty ripping up old carpet to discover oak floors and cleaning the fireplace soot from old Pennsylvania stone the charm of the “good bones” has won me over.

house

IMG_1369

Cait & Sam will restore this home to its former beauty. Better, yet, together, they will fill this house with love, family gatherings and special memories. Isn’t that what investing in a house is all about? Add a garden and life is good.

cinderella pumpkin

cinderella pumpkin

By now you must have figured out I am too tired (from house renovations) to talk about grief. It takes a certain amount of brain power to intelligently discuss that subject and right now I have none. Actually, being totally distracted by hard labor did remind me of something and that is that helping someone else achieve a goal is a great feel-good exercise. We should all do it more often. If grief is getting the best of you lately, give it a try. Volunteer, help a neighbor or call a friend or family member and see if they could use a hand. Your life will be brighter!

congrats on your new home

congrats on your new home

By now you must have also figured out that today’s recipe has something to do with pumpkins. They are not only decorative, but delicious in so many recipes both savory and sweet. I love growing my own and surprisingly my garden is filled with them ripe for the pickin. Yes, it is still summer, but what’s a girl to do, but give you a pumpkin recipe. Especially since my dear hubby surprised me with a Waring Pro Professional Double Belgian Waffle Maker including a recipe for pumpkin waffles. This morning I surprised him with a well deserved treat. Enjoy.

IMG_3017

Success in life & the kitchen

 

Heirloom Tomato Salad with Pesto Grilled Cheese  Croutons

Fresh Tomato Salad with Pesto Grilled Cheese
Croutons

Bessie Anderson Stanley wrote this poem in 1904. She won $250.00 in a poetry contest which paid off the mortgage on her house. This famous poem grabbed my attention just yesterday as my nephew, Jeremy, read it at at his grandfather’s funeral. Naturally, it had me thinking of my William, too.

Success

He has achieved success
who has lived well,
laughed often, and loved much;

who has enjoyed the trust of
pure women,

the respect of intelligent men and
the love of little children;

who has filled his niche and accomplished his task;

who has left the world better than he found it
whether by an improved poppy,
a perfect poem or a rescued soul;

who has never lacked appreciation of Earth’s beauty
or failed to express it;

who has always looked for the best in others and
given them the best he had;

whose life was an inspiration;
whose memory a benediction.

At the ripe old age of 90, still living in his own home and cared for by 3 loving sons, my father in-law, Loren D. Keys, Jr. lived a most successful life by any standards. An accomplished banker, world traveler, avid bird watcher and reader of the Wall Street Journal this poem fit him to a tee and made sense.

Grandpa Keys

Grandpa Keys

His death, although sad and painful, made sense, too. The family could see it coming. There was time to put feelings in order. We, along with him, could prepare. It was anticipated. Unlike sudden death and loss, there was a valuable period of time to look into each others eyes and say, “I love you” and good-bye. One has to be grateful for that.

Keys Family Photo

Keys’ Family Photo

Loren’s greatest measure of success is suggested by the line, “the love of little children”. He helped raise up 10 grandchildren who loved him dearly. Missing from this photo is grandson #1..the darling Zachary. He along with my William pre-deceased their grandfather.

fresh pesto

fresh pesto

Success in the kitchen begins with seasonal fresh ingredients. From the backyard garden or a local farm fresh ingredients can’t be beat in flavor, color and texture. Cooking in season is the way to roll. Right now my garden is filled with fresh basil, flat leaf parsley and grape tomatoes which brings this award winning recipe to you. The pesto is inspired by Marcella Hazan. The only thing different I do is add a cup of fresh parsley. I think it gives the pesto an extra bright green color and some added sweetness.

Fresh Tomato  Salad with Pesto Grilled Cheese Croutons

¼ cup prepared basil pesto

4 slices thinly sliced firm white bread, crusts removed

1 ball fresh mozzarella, sliced

2 to 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil plus additional for brushing on to bread

2 cups (1 pint) mixed cherry or grape tomatoes, halved

kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

10 fresh basil leaves, thinly sliced plus fresh sprigs for garnish

1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar

1 small fresh chile pepper, seeded, thinly sliced into slivers

2 tablespoons freshly grated parmesan cheese

Spread pesto over two slices of bread; top with mozzarella in a single even layer. Cover cheese with another bread slice forming a sandwich. Brush both sides of sandwich with olive oil. Grill sandwiches until toasted golden brown on both sides; set aside on cutting surface. Meanwhile, in a bowl, combine all tomatoes; season with salt and pepper. Sprinkle the basil and chile pepper over the tomatoes. Drizzle with olive oil and vinegar; toss gently. Divide salad among 4 serving plates. Sprinkle with parmesan cheese. Slice grilled cheese sandwiches into bite-size pieces; arrange on salad plates. Garnish with fresh basil sprigs. Makes 4 servings.

BLENDER PESTO

(From Marcella Hazan’s The Classic Italian Cook Book)

2 cups fresh basil leaves (see note below) 1⁄2 cup olive oil 2 tablespoons pine nuts 2 cloves garlic, lightly crushed with a heavy handle and peeled 1 teaspoon salt

1⁄2 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese 2 tablespoons freshly grated Romano pecorino cheese 3 tablespoons butter, softened to room temperature

Put the basil, olive oil, pine nuts, garlic cloves, and salt in the blender and mix at high speed. Stop from time to time and scrape the ingredients down toward the bottom of the blender cup with a rubber spatula.

When the ingredients are evenly blended, pour into a bowl and beat in the two grated cheeses by hand. (This is not much work, and it results in more interesting texture and better flavor than you get when you mix in the cheese in the blender.) When the cheese has been evenly incorporated into the other ingredients, beat in the softened butter.

Before spooning the pesto over pasta, add to it a tablespoon or so of the hot water in which the pasta has boiled.

*Note: The quantity of basil in most recipes is given in terms of whole leaves. American basil, however, varies greatly in leaf sizes. There are small, medium, and very large leaves, and they all pack differently in the measuring cup. For the sake of accurate measurement, I suggest that you tear all but the tiniest leaves into two or more small pieces. Be gentle, so as not to crush the basil. This would discolor it and waste the first, fresh droplets of juice.

Serves 6.

Summer View: Will’s Bench &Grilling Tips

 

Grilled Steak

juicy grilled steak

Will’s Bench at Lake Elise in Middlebury, CT  is a wonderful place to sit and watch the world go by. Peaceful and filled with wildlife, the area is perfect for bird watching or fishing for large mouth bass. Dogs sniff the banks and often dive in for a cool swim. I especially love sitting on the bench on a summer morning having coffee with old friends. The kind of friends that are tried and true, have been around through thick and thin and after all these years are still willing to sit in silence and shed a few a tears or laughs recalling the antics of our kids. The morning mist rises off the clear water flecked with lily pads as the warmth of the sun breaks through.

BFF's Bev & Carol

BFF’s Bev & Carol

Friends like Bev and Carol are priceless. Every griever needs at least one Bev or one Carol in their life, but preferably both. They are the kind of selfless people who know how to step outside themselves for the good of another. It comes natural to them. Their simple presence creates a safe and comforting atmosphere that invites the sharing of feelings and healing. So much healing has taken place on this now weathered wooden bench on the edge of a lake–even on the day that bird pooped on my hand.

summer view from the bench

summer view from the bench

Another summer view

 

 

 

IMG_0701

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_0211Let me know if you ever get to Lake Elise, but until then let’s get grilling. We all love a good steak, so it being summer let’s share a few grilling tips plus a delicious recipe that also includes grilled watermelon. That’s right-grilled watermelon.

  1. Take the chill off your steak by removing it from the fridge 30 minutes before grill time. It will cook more evenly.
  2. Pat the steak dry with paper towels to avoid steaming the meat.
  3. Crank your grill up to HIGH. Lightly grease the grate.
  4. For gorgeous grill marks and delicious caramelized flavor follow the 10-2 rule of grilling (see recipe for explanation).
  5. Let the meat rest for 10 minutes before slicing.

IMG_0759

Grilled Steakhouse Rib-Eye & Watermelon Wedge

1/2 cup dry red wine

2 tablespoons honey

1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce

½ cup blue cheese dressing

4 (1-inch thick) ribeye steaks

kosher salt

freshly ground black pepper

1/2 small, seedless watermelon, rind removed, cut into thick wedges

¼ cup crumbled blue cheese

2 green onions, thinly sliced on bias

8 fresh mint or basil leaves, thinly sliced plus additional sprigs for garnish

Heat grill to high. In small saucepan, over high heat, combine, wine, honey and Worcestershire sauce. Bring sauce mixture to a boil, reduce heat and simmer until reduced to a syrupy consistency; set aside. Season steaks on both sides with a generous amount of salt and pepper. Place steaks on hot, lightly greased grill rack pointing one edge towards 10:00. Grill 2 to 3 minutes creating well-browned grill marks. Rotate steak so that same edge now points toward 2:00. Grill 2 minutes. Now repeat process on other side of steak. Reduce heat to medium. Grill steaks, 3 to 4 minutes more or until medium-rare (125 degrees on an instant read thermometer). Transfer steaks to plate; cover with foil and let rest 5 to 10 minutes. Meanwhile, season watermelon with salt and pepper; place on lightly greased grill rack for 2 minutes per side or until charred grill marks begin to form. Arrange steaks and watermelon on serving plates. Drizzle dressing over watermelon. Drizzle wine sauce over steaks. Sprinkle with green onions, herbs and blue cheese. Garnish with fresh herb sprigs. Serves 4.

perfect grill marks following the 10-2 rule

perfect grill marks following the 10-2 rule

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Memories & Recipes: Please Share

low country potato salad

low country potato salad

Have you read The Giver by Lois Lowry? It is the story of a frightening world where freedom of choice has been taken away. It is a world of government-controlled sameness devoid of emotion and memories. There are vivid scenes of infanticide and elder euthanasia that brings this one to tears. Thankfully, the main character, a 12-year-old named Jonas, is about to set this world on fire. He is “the Receiver” of the memories and quickly learns it is just too much for one person to bear.

sharing some memories

Sharing some memories

 

memories of great friends

Fun Family Memories

Like Jonas, I agree that memories are meant to share. After William died the best gifts given to me were memories of him. The personal stories provided a glimpse into his world through the eyes of others. I learned so much about him from friends, family, classmates, military brothers and sisters. They felt so very privileged to know him and were delighted to share a few tales. It was the good, the bad and the ugly of William. It was comforting. For the most part it made me laugh and to this day thoughts of these memories continue to heal me. I would be lying, however, if I did not admit to at least one story that made me cringe. Trying to put that one out of my mind and forgive the one who shared it.

memories of great friends

Memories of great friends

So if you ever find yourself wondering what to say or write to someone who is grieving…Share a good memory of the deceased. And if you live close and feel the need to stop by share a family favorite recipe. Bring your most comforting dish. It is a sign of your love and caring. Don’t forget to share a copy of the recipe.IMG_0845

I never quite understand those who covet their recipes. Guarding grandma’s secret sauce mix or worse, yet, sharing a recipe, but omitting an ingredient on purpose. I, on the other hand, think it the ultimate compliment when one asks me for a copy of a recipe. Recipes like memories are meant to share. Enjoy. This one brings back memories of my days in the South.

Low Country Style Potato Salad

12 small (1 pound) red-skinned potatoes

2 tablespoons Old Bay seasoning

½ pound large shrimp, shelled, deveined

1 cup fresh cut or frozen sweet corn, thawed

2 links fresh andouille sausage, casing removed

½ cup mayonnaise

¼ cup chili sauce

2 tablespoons chopped flat leaf parsley plus additional for garnish

1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice

2 teaspoons prepared horseradish

1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce

1 rib crisp celery, chopped

4 green onions, thinly sliced including some of the green part

2 hard-boiled eggs, peeled and chopped

Place a metal steamer basket in a large pot. Add water to a depth of 2- inches. In a bowl, toss potatoes with vinegar. Drain vinegar into pot with water; bring water-vinegar mixture to a boil. Toss potatoes with 1 tablespoon old bay seasoning; place in steamer basket, cover and cook 20 minutes or until tender. Transfer potatoes to a plate; let cool. In bowl, toss shrimp with remaining 1-tablespoon old bay seasoning. Place shrimp and corn in steamer basket; cover and cook 3 to 5 minutes or until fully cooked. Transfer to plate; let cool. Meanwhile, brown sausage in small skillet, breaking up into crumbles with a wooden spoon; set aside. In small bowl, whisk mayonnaise, chili sauce, parsley, lemon juice, horseradish and Worcestershire sauce; cover and chill dressing until ready to assemble salad. Cut potatoes and shrimp into bite-size pieces. In a large bowl, toss potatoes, shrimp, corn, half the sausage crumbles, celery, green onions and eggs with the dressing. Place potato salad on a large serving platter. Sprinkle with remaining sausage crumbles and garnish with parsley. Serves 6.

 

 

 

 

Grief & Treats From Mother Nature

wouldn't it be fun to pick cupcakes in the garden

wouldn’t it be fun to pick cupcakes in the garden

Good grief and nature go together like basil and tomatoes. There is no escaping it. As much as I thought I could take a break from grief there is so much about Mother Nature that keeps it right on the edge of my mind and in my heart. William was such an outdoorsman. As a kid, he loved everything about playing in the woods. His passions included hunting, fishing or just being with Mother Nature. Fond memories include playing eye-spy searching out critters hiding in the brush. He was happy.

in the Adirondaks: photo courtesy of the Van Sant family

Our new backyard (we have lived here 2 years now) brings William into my heart nearly every day. This week there are dancing blue birds, red tailed hawks, overhead, teaching their babies to fly and just this morning 4 young bucks butting heads—the latter brings an automatic, “Good Morning, William” from my lips. It makes me happy.

my yard: photo by Carol Walsh

my yard: photo by Carol Walsh

As always I am thankful to have these moments with William and to live in such a beautiful place. I am also thankful that the deer have kept their distance from my garden and that Mother Nature has provided us with an abundance of delicious fruits and vegetables for me to play with in the kitchen.

IMG_2806

Take the zucchini (please take some) for instance. I only planted 2 seeds and I have more than I know what to do with. It’s been grilled, roasted, stuffed and pancaked, but my favorite new recipe are these little cakes. Enjoy!

Yucatan Squash Cakes

3 cups white whole wheat flour (I use King Arthur brand)

1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder

1 teaspoon baking soda

1 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon cinnamon

pinch cayenne pepper, optional

1/2 cup cocoa powder

4 large eggs, room temperature

2 ½ cups granulated sugar

½ cup canola oil

¾ cup applesauce

¼ cup unsalted butter, melted

3 cups shredded zucchini, lightly tamp it down into the cup

Preheat oven 350F. Lightly grease or line 2 ½ dozen muffin cups with paper liners. Sift the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, cinnamon and cocoa powder into a large bowl, then whisk until blended and set aside. 

 In mixing bowl, beat eggs on high speed with an electric mixer for 2−3 minutes gradually adding the sugar. Beat until mixture is pale yellow, thick and creamy. Add oil, applesauce and melted butter; beat until well mixed. Add the flour mixture to the egg mixture and fold gently by hand until dry ingredients are completely moistened and mixed. Stir in zucchini. Using a standard ice cream scoop, fill muffin cups about 2/3 full. 
Bake 25 minutes or until wooden pick inserted in cupcake comes out clean. Cool. Dust with powdered sugar or add a chocolate glaze or frosting, if desired, but really not needed. Makes 2 1/2 dozen cupcakes

Birthday, Basil & Cheesecake, Oh, My!

 

Basil Infused Strawberry Cheesecake

Basil Infused Strawberry Cheesecake

It was a 11 years ago, on her 18th birthday, when I presented Caitlin with 18 hand-written love letters. It was an annual event for me to write my baby girl a letter on July 14th and stash it away in a “treasure box”. Now, as she was leaving the nest, it was time for my first-born to have them. Hopefully, seeing herself through a loving mother’s eyes and remembering all the goodness she had brought to our family would give her strength and wisdom as she set off on her own.

Cait & Sam graduate

Cait & Sam graduate

As parents, Bill and I could not have been more proud when Caitlin graduated with honors in economics from Wake Forest University. Wow!-we thought, money well-spent. She was on her way to her first big job in Philadelphia and the huge responsibility of seriously paying her own bills (woohoo!) Pretty sure there were times when she wished she was back in college, but she perseveres receiving promotion after promotion. Hello Ms Marketing Director.

marriage

And then came marriage and one of the happiest days of our lives. Hello, Mrs. Pemberton. Tomorrow she turns 29 and I realize I owe her way more than a love letter, but that is between me and her.

love my baby girl

love my baby girl

I will, however, share with you her favorite dessert which is cheesecake. Inspired by the plentiful basil in my garden and the juiciest, ripest strawberries ever this recipe is cause for celebration. Happy Birthday dear Caitlin!

cheesecake

Basil Infused Strawberry Cheesecake

1-cup heavy cream

8 fresh basil leaves, plus additional for garnish

1 tablespoon powdered sugar

Crust

1 cup crushed chocolate cookie crumbs (18 Nabisco Chocolate Wafer cookies)

2 tablespoons sugar

4 tablespoons melted butter

Filling

3 (8 oz) packages cream cheese, softened

¾ cup sugar

3 eggs

1 pound fresh strawberries (reserve 9 berries for garnish and puree the rest)

1 teaspoon vanilla

¼ cup plain Greek yogurt or sour cream

Heat oven to 325F. In a microwave safe measuring cup heat heavy cream on HIGH for 1 minute. Bruise basil leaves lightly with your fingers and submerge in hot cream; set aside to steep. Mix cookie crumbs, sugar and butter until crumbly; press over bottom of 9-inch spring-form pan; bake 8 minutes. Cool on wire rack. In large bowl, beat cream cheese and sugar with an electric mixer until light and fluffy, about 3 minutes. Beat in eggs, strawberry puree (you should have about 1 cup), vanilla, ¼ cup of basil infused heavy cream (cover and refrigerate the remaining basil-cream mixture) and yogurt until well mixed. Pour batter into crust. Bake 50 to 55 minutes or until center is just set. Do not over bake. Cool to room temperature before transferring to the refrigerator to chill completely. Run a knife around the pan sides. Remove sides of pan. Remove basil from chilled cream. Add powdered sugar and beat with an electric mixture to stiff peaks. Garnish top of cheesecake with basil-whipped cream, reserved strawberries and basil sprigs, if desired. Serves 12.

Tips:

#1 place a piece of plastic wrap over the bowl of your food processor before securing the top to keep the top from getting dirty (since I hate washing the top)

puree the strawberries in a food processor

puree the strawberries in a food processor

#2 use a flat bottom cup to pat the crumb crust into place and the back of a spoon to smooth around the edge

easy crumb crust

easy crumb crust

 

 

 

Happy Food Memories & A Give Away

It is incredible when a simple scent or taste of something evokes a childhood memory. The moment is warm and wonderful and happy. Hopefully, the moment is also delicious as was the case for me when I made some Asian baby back ribs using Butcher Block’s Rib Sauce. Before we dip into the sauce let me give you a bit of history.

me and the kids making some food memories

me and the kids making some food memories

Growing up in a traditional Italian home my mom cooked nearly every night for all 7 of us. Having only raised two, I honestly can’t imagine how much work it was for her to cook for 5 children, 4 of them being very hungry boys. I am not certain she really liked to cook, so when she got a Friday or Saturday night off it was a total treat for her. And when Mama’s happy everybody is happy! Dining out in our household meant one of two things: Chrone’s for pizza or Chu Dynasty for Chinese.

 

Asian style ribs

Asian style ribs

My dad adored Asian food and I am certain my love for the same came from him. It certainly wasn’t any kind of food that was ever prepared in my mom’s kitchen, so going to Chu Dynasty on route 22 was always pure delight. Dad always ordered “family style” from column A and column B. Everything from wonton soup to lobster cantonese and always, always, always spareribs (or as we joked “spare-libs”). Those were his favorites. The ribs, as I recall, were always meaty, juicy and falling off the bone….and an odd shade of red. How did they make them?

love this stuff

love this stuff

Time to dip into the sauce. Many years ago I became familiar with the Butcher Block brand when I tried their teriyaki sauce. It is better than homemade with simple ingredients like sugar, soy sauce, water, fresh garlic and fresh ginger. It is delicious and convenient and has been the secret ingredient in a number of my recipe contests wins. Check out the Harley Davidson motorcycle I won using the sauce in a salad dressing. Trust me it is the sauce that is the winner.

me and my cherry apple red Harley

me and my cherry apple red Harley

So when Diane over at Butcher Block headquarters in Boston asked me to try their rib sauce and blog about it I was all in. I had never seen the rib sauce before and was curious. When I opened it up and caught a whiff I knew I had seen that shade of red before. It had Chinese BBQ spareribs written all over it. In fact, it is the original as noted on the jar and one bite of my simply prepared ribs brought me right back to those family dinners at Chu Dynasty. I would have loved to have been able to make these for my dad.

Butcher Block Rib Sauce

Butcher Block Rib Sauce

It only takes 4 simple ingredients.

Asian BBQ Ribs

Asian BBQ Ribs

Baby Back Ribs–as many slabs as you need (no trimming necessary)

kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

Butcher Block Rib Sauce

Heat oven to 500F. Fill a roasting pan (I used my oven broiler pan) with 1/2-inch of water. Place a rack on the pan. Season ribs generously with salt and pepper; place on rack. Cover the ribs with heavy duty foil, forming a tent so the foil isn’t touching the ribs and seal the foil tightly around the edge of the pan. Place in hot oven for 1 hour. Cool in tented foil for 1 hour. Remove from pan, wrap in foil and chill until ready to grill. Grill ribs, over medium heat, turning and basting with rib sauce, until hot and glazed. Be careful as the meat will be falling off the bone….YUM!

Asian candied bacon

Asian candied bacon

Just for fun I also used the rib sauce to candy some bacon. All I did was dice 6 slices of bacon, cooked it until it was crisp (draining the grease as needed) and then added 1 tablespoon of rib sauce to the pan, stirring until the bacon was glazed. It was a big hit on top of these sliders which I also glazed with the rib sauce.

Asian Pork Sliders with Candied Bacon

Asian Pork Sliders with Candied Bacon

I hope I have inspired you today to make some food memories with your family and maybe even a recipe contest winner. If you would like to try any of the Butcher Block products you can order them on-line at http://www.butcherblocksauces.com or you can give them a call at 1-617-269-1105. I imagine if you are lucky enough to live in the Boston area you can pick them up in your local grocery store. And if you are feeling lucky then please leave a comment so I can enter you into today’s give away sponsored by Butcher Block. What fun it would be to win a prize pack of these delicious sauces. Good luck.

Freedom Isn’t Free

645160262110

My guess is that some of our overseas military are not having as much fun as we are today.  We are enjoying our freedom to eat and drink whatever we want. We can choose to jump in the pool or stretch out in a hammock. Or maybe we are fishing off the dock or burying our painted toes in the sand. Where ever we are or whatever we are doing we have our military to thank. These folks have a tough job and my plee to you today is to thank them.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

If you are thankful for your freedom then please consider sending a care package to a marine or sailor. My son was once part of Weapons Company. These guys are amazing and still in Afghanistan. Here is an address. Go fill a flat rate box with ramen and tuna and magazines and granola and whatever you think and can afford….include a love note from home. Thank you for the support.

Any Marine

Weapons Co 2nd PLT

1st Bn, 2D Marines

Unit 13995

FPO, AE 09510-3995

A Summer Break, Beets & Berries

berries & basil

summer berries and basil

We are just one week into summer and I am ready for a vacation. Not the travel kind, but the blog writing kind. This grief stuff takes a bit of a toll on a person and “write” now I just need happy thoughts. So, I know you won’t mind if, for just a little while, all we do is talk about good food and recipes. Ha–I bet you are raising your hands in the air yelling,  “Yipee!”

In the last couple of weeks my garden has brought me so much happiness and inspiration in the kitchen. For the first time ever I have been able to grow beets which inspired a most delicious roasted beet sandwich. Just look at these beauties all roasted and sweet.

 the fixin's for the beet sandwich

the fixin’s for the beet sandwich

If this idea tickles your fancy or you’re just more curious check out the full recipe here: http://healthy.betterrecipes.com/roasted-beet-smashed-avocado-feta-sandwich.html

Roasted Beet Sandwich

Roasted Beet Sandwich

In addition to the beets I am picking berries. Lots of berries. In fact, me and the birds are plucking 3 different kinds. The purple bird poop (yuck) all over the yard would indicate the birds prefer the mulberries over the strawberries and the “raspberry shortcake” brazel berries (thank goodness).  It has been such a delight to gather, raspberries, strawberries and mulberries and work them into different recipes. This one is perfect for the 4th of July.

Chocolate Vinegar, Berry & Basil Pie

Chocolate Vinegar, Berry & Basil Pie a la mode

Red, white and blue food. It’s what we do this time of year. It is the reason I grow borage. The borage plant has edible blue flowers that taste like cucumbers. They are the perfect garnish for that potato salad we all make with the red, white and blue potatoes, but sorry I went off on this borage tangent instead of talking about this pie.

IMG_2539

This pie is oddly delicious. I say “oddly” because the pie contains dark chocolate vinegar, fresh basil and black pepper. It is sweet and savory and well, oddly delicious. The dark chocolate vinegar is imported for Bella Gusta of West Hartford, CT  by the Veronica Foods Company of Oakland, CA. It was a gift from my sister in law, Erin. She handed it to me saying, “I know if anyone can figure out what to do with this, you can.” I like her confidence. And if you are interested check out: http://www.bellagustaoils.com

pie

Just one tip on baking berry pies (I have learned the hard way). Berry pies have to come to a bubbling frenzy before they are fully cooked and the thickening agent is able to gel the fruit. That way when you cut into the pie all the juice doesn’t go running all over the plate and then down your shirt. So forget the baking time because every batch of fruit is different and just watch for that bubbling happiness. You are welcome!

Chocolate Vinegar 3x Berry Pie

(Inspired by the famous Butter & Scotch Bakery in Brooklyn)

Pastry for 2 crust lattice pie

2 pounds of fresh berries (I used 1 pound of halved strawberries, ¾ pound mulberries and 1 pint of raspberries)

3 tablespoons chocolate vinegar

8 basil leaves, shredded (use Thai basil if you have it)

¾ cup sugar

¼ cup cornstarch

½ teaspoon ground black pepper

pinch of salt

Heat oven to 425F. Roll out half your pastry into a 12-inch circle and fit into a 9-inch pie plate leaving the dough that overhangs the pie plate in place. In large bowl, toss the berries with the vinegar and basil. Mix the sugar, cornstarch, black pepper and salt; sprinkle over the berries and toss again. Spoon into prepared pie crust. Roll out remaining dough into a 15-inch x 11-inch rectangle. Using a pizza wheel and a ruler, cut 1-inch strips and form the lattice top. Trim the excess lattice ends. Fold the bottom crust up and over the lattice strips and crimp. Place the pie on a baking sheet. Bake for 25 minutes or until lattice is golden brown. Reduce the heat to 375F. Continue baking for 40 minutes or until juices are bubbling. Cool completely. Serves 8.

 

 

Good Days & Bacon Days

puffy pancakesI spent a significant part of my day yesterday creating this recipe for a contest only to realize I had missed the deadline. It has been that kind of week or should I say month. It is embarrassing to say, but there was also an episode of putting my shorts on backwards and not realizing it until many hours later and an episode of trying to get into a car in the parking lot that did not belong to little old me. Clearly, I am distracted.

William in the sunglasses

William in the dark sunglasses at Taft

Brain misfires like these make me feel like I am taking a few steps backwards. It is an upsurge in grief. I know why it is happening. It is June and there are lots of graduation parties going on. Some of my proudest moments in life were seeing my children graduate from high school and Caitlin from college. I so looked forward to William going to college, too.

Will & Cait at Wake Forest University

Will & Cait at Wake Forest University

I don’t know about you, but as a parent I marked my life by the events and accomplishments of my children.  From the time they took their first step, to getting a good report card, to making the team or not, graduating, getting married….all these things reinforced my role as a parent. I love nothing more than being a mom.

There are times I yearn for William. Truly, I am happy to see his friends graduate or getting engaged or having children, but at the same time it can be excruciating. I am growing up with a loss. I have a lot to learn, but I know I will survive these brief upsurges of grief. And you will, too.

ebelskiver

Now for the recipe. It is far from a misfire and rather far out of my comfort zone. Puffy little pancakes with caramel and bacon; the perfect balance of salty, sweet and savory. I think it is a winner.The ebelskiver pan can be yours from where else but Williams-Sonoma.

Salted Caramel-Bacon Ebelskivers (puffy pancakes)

6 slices thick cut apple wood smoked bacon

20 caramel candies, unwrapped*

¼ cup heavy cream

pinch of kosher salt

½ cup all purpose flour

1 teaspoon sugar

¼ teaspoon baking powder

1 egg, separated

½ cup milk

1 tablespoon melted butter

½ teaspoon vanilla extract

Heat oven to 200F. Cook bacon until crisp. Transfer bacon to paper towel to drain; reserve bacon grease. Crumble bacon into bowl of a food processor; pulse until finely chopped. In small saucepan, over low heat, stir caramel candies, cream and salt until melted and smooth; keep warm. In small bowl, whisk flour, sugar and baking powder. In another bowl, whisk egg yolk, milk, butter and vanilla. Pour wet ingredients and ½ cup bacon into dry ingredients; blend well with a spoon. The batter will look lumpy. Beat egg white until stiff peaks form. Fold 1/3rd of egg white into batter to lighten it up. Fold remaining egg whites in until fully incorporated. Brush the wells of an ebelskiver pan lightly with the reserved bacon grease; place over medium-low heat. When the bacon grease is hot, spoon 1 tablespoon of batter into each well. Working quickly, spoon ½ teaspoon of warm caramel into center of each pancake. Top each with another tablespoonful of batter. Cook for 3 to 5 minutes or until the bottom of the pancakes are golden brown and crisp. Using two wooden skewers or chopsticks, turn the pancakes and cook for 3 more minutes or until golden brown. Transfer pancakes to an oven-safe platter and keep warm in oven while making the second batch. Arrange pancakes on platter. Drizzle with some warm caramel and sprinkle with 1 tablespoon bacon. Serve passing remaining caramel sauce. Makes 14 ebelskivers.

*note: ½ cup of high quality prepared caramel sauce may be substituted for this homemade sauce