Gold Star Moms and a Cookbook

Let’s talk about the real Gold Star community and not the current political nonsense. Just for the record when my son died in 2011 I wrote to the then President and the first lady. In my naivete, I thought the President might have some answers and the first lady, a mom like me, would offer some comforting words, but I got nothing. No personal response from those in the White House made me feel like my son’s life didn’t matter. So my advice, don’t listen to what either side is saying right now about Gold Star families. It’s all painful media hype.

Then there is Heather Kuhn. Heather was the Navy Gold Star Program Coordinator assigned to my area of the country. Coordinators assist families with benefit questions connecting them to valuable resources concerning bereavement and financial planning support. They also provide opportunities to celebrate our fallen service member through events connecting the Gold Star community. When Heather reached out about creating this cookbook I was all in.

It really wasn’t a tough choice picking a recipe that William liked best. I did think about his favorite Boston cream pie and even a couple of recipes that he created himself…”waffles supreme” and a sandwich he called “the American Hero”, but clearly this chicken dish was the one he asked for more than any other. He loved a little bit of chicken fried.

Heather writes

I believe we all can relate that when faced with loss and grief and mourning – which is not a phase or a stage, but rather a journey – many fond memories are often brought back with familiar sounds and comforting smells, and the tastes of the meals shared with those we have loved and lost, but cherish still.

I am grateful she was inspired to reach out to Gold Star families and compile a book filled with recipe favorites and memories of our fallen service members. This book is not for sale, but available for free electronically for those wishing to read and honor our fallen heroes.

never forget ❤

For Your Meditation

“Whenever someone sorrows, I do not say, “forget it,” or “it will pass,” or “it could be worse” — all of which deny the integrity of the painful experience. But I say, to the contrary, “It is worse than you may allow yourself to think. Delve into the depth. Stay with the feeling. Think of it as a precious source of knowledge and guidance. Then and only then will you be ready to face it and be transformed in the process.” ~ Peter Koestenbaum

Let’s Meditate

We cannot re-create this world…We cannot even, truly, re-create ourselves. Only our behavior can we re-create, or create anew. ~Alice Walker

Healing After Loss meditations by Martha Whitmore Hickman

All winter, in many parts of the country, the earth has lain brown and barren—or covered with chilling snow.

But beneath that apparently lifeless earth the roots of plants have maintained themselves in a necessary hibernation. Then, come spring, year after year, the earth comes to life again, and blooms with beauty and nurturance.

Maybe this can be a model of trust for us in these new green months of early summer—that the season of depression and sorrow will, in time, give way to a renewed love of life and appreciation for its gifts—including the gift of the life and the legacy of the one we have loved.

Lonicera (honeysuckle) Peaches and Cream